Spring and early summer

After an unusually long and varied winter in the UK this year, which produced a range of weathers from prolonged wet days to heavy snow in mid-March, spring was most welcome by many of us. Although I love being in icy and snowy conditions, I do appreciate and enjoy the emerging signs of spring which then quickly merge into early summer. During this period I am often away from my the UK, but this year I stayed home and as promised in one of my previous blogs, I decided to shoot closer to home. Spring provides the landscape photographer with the chance to capture shades of green from the emerging ferns, early tree growth and in later spring, bluebells.

Mist in Reedham woods
Mist in Reedham woods

 

Along with the signs of spring, there are often accompanying mists which cloak woodland and inland scenes creating a sense of mystique. This year in Norfolk there have been many mornings of quite thick fog and heavy mist hanging over the countryside as you will see from the photos.

May fog on the pathway- Loddon
May fog on the pathway- Loddon

Spring light gives us a colour palette of yellows and pale greens which, accompanied by early morning dew, reflects the light in a very special way. Using a polariser sometimes helps intensify colours but can also take the sparkle out of the moisture. It all depends what you are looking for.

Into the woods
Into the woods

As with all photography we aim to capture an emotional response within our shots. For me, at this time of year, I aim to create a sense of hope and renewal. As spring turns to summer, the landscape photographer also has the opportunity to get up in the middle of the night to greet the dawn at around 3.50 am. We all hope the conditions make it worth it!

Sunlit West woods